Service Level Definitions

The child needing basic services is capable of responding to limit setting or other interventions used in a normal family setting.  The characteristics of the child may include:

1.       Transient difficulties and occasional misbehavior;

2.       Acting out in response to stress, but episodes of acting out are brief; and

3.       Behavior that is minimally disturbing to others, but the behavior is considered typical for the child’s age and can be corrected.

The characteristics of a child with developmental delays or mental retardation may include minor to moderate difficulties with conceptual, social, and practical adaptive skills.

The child needing Moderate services has problems in one or more areas of functioning.  The characteristics of the child may include:

  1. Frequent non-violent, anti-social acts;
  2. Occasional physical aggression;
  3. Minor self-injurious actions; and
  4. Difficulties that present a moderate risk of harm to self or others.

The characteristics of a child who abuses alcohol, drugs, or other conscious-altering substances may include:

  1. Substance abuse to the extent or frequency that the child is at risk of substantial problems; and
  2. A historical diagnosis of substance abuse or dependency with a need for regular community support through groups or similar interventions.

The characteristics of a child with developmental delays or mental retardation may include:

  1. Moderate to substantial difficulties with conceptual, social, and practical adaptive skills to include daily living and self-care; and
  2. Moderate impairment in communication, cognition, or expressions of affect.

The characteristics of a child with primary medical or habilitative needs may include:

  1. Occasional exacerbations or intermittent interventions in relation to the diagnosed medical condition;
  2. Limited daily living and self-care skills;
  3. Ambulatory with assistance; and
  4. Daily access to on-call, medically skilled caregivers.

The child needing Specialized services has severe problems in one or more areas of functioning.  The characteristics of the child may include:

  1. Unpredictable non-violent, anti-social acts;
  2. Frequent or unpredictable physical aggression;
  3. Being markedly withdrawn and isolated;
  4. Major self-injurious actions to include recent suicide attempts; and
  5. Difficulties that present a significant risk of harm to self or others.

The characteristics of a child who abuses alcohol, drugs, or other conscious-altering substances may include:

  1. Severe impairment because of the substance abuse; and
  2. A primary diagnosis of substance abuse or dependency.

The characteristics of a child with developmental delays or mental retardation may include:

1.    Severely impaired conceptual, social, and practical adaptive skills to include daily living and self-care;

2.    Severe impairment in communication, cognition or expressions of affect;

3.    Lack of motivation or the inability to complete self-care activities or participate in social activities;

4.    Inability to respond appropriately to an emergency; and

5.    Multiple physical disabilities including sensory impairments.

The characteristics of a child with primary medical or habilitative needs may include:

  1. Regular or frequent exacerbations or interventions in relation to the diagnosed medical condition;
  2. Severely limited daily living and self-care skills;
  3. Non-ambulatory or confined to a bed; and
  4. Constant access to on-site, medically skilled caregivers.

The child needing Intense services has severe problems in one or more areas of functioning that presents an imminent and critical danger of harm to self or others.  A child whose characteristics include:

  1. Extreme physical aggression that causes harm;
  2. Recurring major self-injurious actions to include serious suicide attempts;
  3. Other difficulties that present a critical risk of harm to self or others; and
  4. Severely impaired reality testing, communication skills, cognitive, affect, or personal hygiene.

The characteristics of a child who abuses alcohol, drugs, or other conscious-altering substances whose characteristics include a primary diagnosis of substance dependency in addition to being extremely aggressive or self-destructive to the point of causing harm.

 The characteristics of a child with developmental delays or mental retardation whose characteristics may include:

  1. Impairments so severe in conceptual, social, and practical adaptive skills that the child’s ability to actively participate in the program is limited and requires constant 1 to 1 supervision for the safety of self or others; and
  2. A consistent inability to cooperate in self-care while requiring, constant 1 to 1 supervision for the safety of self or others.

The characteristics of a child with primary medical or habilitative needs that presents an imminent and critical medical risk whose characteristics may include:

1.       Frequent acute exacerbations and chronic, intensive interventions in relation to the diagnosed medical condition;

2.       Unable to perform daily living or self-care skills; and

3.       Requires 24-hour on-site, medical supervision to sustain life support.